July 27, 2014
81,210 notes
+ design

ckck:

Seems like IKEA are really shaking things up this year. In addition to the previously announced TV set, they’re also going to release a digital camera made of cardboard called Knäppa (“Snap”). It’ll hold 40 photographs at a time and plugs directly into your USB port. While it’s not the prettiest camera the world has ever seen, I do love the idea of a screen-less digital camera that brings people back to the wait-and-see days of film.

(via bumbumchicabum)

July 27, 2014
202,295 notes
+ design
+ places

July 26, 2014
1,340 notes
+ people
+ fashion

officialstevenmeisel2:

glam-val:

Fire Starters; Julianne Moore, Liv Freundlich, Jessica Chastain, Domhnall Gleeson, Amy Adams, Karen Elson, Madison Stubbington & Florence Welch by Annie Leibovitz for Vogue US, August 2014 

(via thebeecharmer9)

July 25, 2014
328,770 notes
+ art

bambiandpixie:

shitpostmemeboy:

dogmemes:

hoodbypussy:

Évolution inversée

he looked old for 14

“It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child.”
― Pablo Picasso

All so beautiful

(via saladormer)

July 25, 2014
27,908 notes
+ tv
+ buffy

July 21, 2014
5 notes
+ books
+ world

thisbirdhasflown:

"By the early decades of the twentieth century, public health authorities in England and the United States could no longer ignore the links between refined white flour and widespread nutritional deficiencies, including beriberi, as well as increases in the rates of both heart disease and diabetes. But by now the White Flour Industrial Complex was so well entrenched that shift back to whole-grain flour was never seriously contemplated.

Instead, the milling industry and government came up with a clever technological fix: A handful of vitamins that modern milling had removed from bread would now be put back in. So in the early 1940’s, in what was called “the quiet miracle,” the U.S. government worked with baking companies—including the Continental Baking Company, makers of Wonder Bread—to develop and promote a white bread fortified with a handful of B vitamins. Here was a classic capitalist “solution”. Rather than go back and address a problem at it’s source—the processing of key nutrients out of wheat—the industry set about processing the product even more. This was sheer brilliance: The milling industry could now sell the problem and the solution in one neat package.”

Cooked: A Natural History Of Transformation, MICHAEL POLLAN

July 20, 2014
+ design
+ me
+ P

[x]

[x]

July 20, 2014
4,811 notes
+ maps
+ design

myidealhome:

gorgeous & stylish room for a kid (via butiksofie.blogspot.de)

myidealhome:

gorgeous & stylish room for a kid (via butiksofie.blogspot.de)

July 19, 2014
89,617 notes
+ world
+ movies

slumkitty:

The Light in Her Eyes (2011)

(via cinematografo)

July 18, 2014
2,190 notes
+ movies

Adèle’s emotions as told by Louise Brooks films: Diary of a Lost Girl (1929) & Pandora’s Box (1929)

(Source: roseydoux, via saladormer)

July 16, 2014
120,665 notes
+ people
+ stories

eabevella:

eccecorinna:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.
In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 
I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like


Rebloggin’ for the fantastic commentary and the edit :)

Perhaps he was upset that his wife could not get the respect she should have get because of the dudebros in the science community at that time. They ordered this painting to appreciate how important she actually was.

eabevella:

eccecorinna:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.

In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 

I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like

image

Rebloggin’ for the fantastic commentary and the edit :)

Perhaps he was upset that his wife could not get the respect she should have get because of the dudebros in the science community at that time. They ordered this painting to appreciate how important she actually was.

(via musicamusa)

July 11, 2014
120,399 notes
+ art
+ me